The Geeks OUT Podcast: Crisis on Infinite Netflix Shows

The Geeks OUT Podcast

Opinions, reviews, incisive discussions of queer geek ideas in pop culture, and the particularly cutting brand of shade that you can only get from a couple of queer geeks all in highly digestible weekly doses.

In this week’s episode of the Geeks OUT Podcast, Kevin is joined by fellow board member Teri Yoshiuchi, as they discuss the next Arrowverse crossover event Crisis on Infinite Earths and whether it will come to Netflix, get excited about the new Batwoman trailer, and celebrate Mr. Ratburn’s wedding on the PBS cartoon Arthur in This Week in Queer.

.

BIG OPENING

KEVIN: The CW’s Crisis on Infinite Earths team-up to span 5 episodes
TERI: New trailer for His Dark Materials

.

DOWN AND NERDY

KEVIN: The Society, iZombie
TERI: Game of Thrones, Diaspora, World of Warcraft: Classic

.

STRONG FEMALE CHARACTER

First trailer released for Batwoman

.

THIS WEEK IN QUEER

Mr. Ratburn from PBS’s Arthur “comes out” and gets married

.

CLIP OF THE WEEK

First look at Nancy Drew

.

THE WEEK IN GEEK

MOVIES

New teaser for Maleficent: Mistress of Evil
• New trailer for Batman: Hush
• The next Star Wars trilogy coming from GOT showrunners
Chris Rock is rebooting Saw
New trailer for Midsommar

.

TV

• Syfy orders Vagrant Queens based on the comic from Mags Visaggio
• New trailer for Los Espookys
Rick and Morty is returning in November
• New teaser for Adult Swim’s Primal
• Hulu adapting Stephen King’s Eyes of the Dragon into a series
• First look at Katy Keene
• First look at new series Evil
• First look at new series Emergence
• First look at new series neXt
Snowpiercer gets renewed for another season, moves to TBS
• New trailer for season 5 of Black Mirror
• New trailer for Motherland: Fort Salem

.

COMIC BOOKS

• Marvel releasing an Age of Conan: Valeria mini

.

SHILF

• KEVIN: Batman
• TERI: Captain America

TFF2019 Review: Pilot Season

Julia Lindon in Lady Liberty

This year’s Tribeca Film Festival Pilot Season features five different television pilots, and with one exception, they’re all terrific.  The first is particularly exciting for LGBT audiences: Lady Liberty, starring Julia Lindon as Shea, a young aspiring comedienne in New York City.  Shea works for an established comedian (Jason Sudeikis), but is afraid to tell him about her own ambitions; she’s also struggling to define her own sexuality after an intense affair with a longtime friend (Rebecca Henderson).  A chance encounter with a beautiful young lesbian (Karen Eilbacher) in an Uber pool leads to her first night out with “gay gals,” and it’s clear that Miller’s taking her first thrilling steps towards self-actualization.  Lindon, who created the series, is tremendously appealing and relatable, and the first episode is wonderfully real and authentic.  I think this could become the next Broad City.

Anastasia Leddick in Halfway

Another, distinctly different strong female is at the center of Halfway, about a woman’s struggle to re-enter society, and reconnect with the daughter she abandoned, after prison.  Anastasia Leddick is mesmerizing as Krystal: she’s got an incredible punk look, and is utterly convincing as a woman who’s been through the ringer.  The first episode is equal turns funny and dramatic, and left me wanting to binge.

Elizabeth De Razzo in Unimundo 45

The rest of the program is comprised of DC Noir, a strong, gritty slice of urban life; the goofy but promising Unimundo 45, about a plus-sized Latinx news producer (Elizabeth De Razzo) looking to inspire her family and friends in the wake of Trump’s election; and the faintly obnoxious Awokened.  The latter was the only entry I had no desire to see more of—it focuses on entitled, irritating millennials and lots of forced wackiness, and it retreads ground better explored by the critically underrated Enlightened.


Pilot Season screens as part of the Tribeca Film Festival.  Visit tribecafilm.com for more info.

TFF 2019 Review: For They Know Not What They Do

Rob & Linda Robertson

Any LGBT individual who grew up religiously—and that’s many of us—knows what it’s like when your faith seemingly conflicts with your identity.  That conflict is at the heart of Daniel Karslake (For the Bible Tells Me So)’s new documentary. Among the most powerful stories: Linda and Rob Robertson, who encouraged their son Ryan to undergo conversion therapy, with tragic results; Vico Baez Febo, who was thrown out of the house by his grandmother for being gay, and later survived the Pulse shooting; and Sarah McBride, the first openly transgender woman ever to speak at the Democratic National Convention.


The film is well executed and affecting, with some deeply emotional testimony from all of the participants, particularly the Robertsons.  The movie does a good job of making us understand their perspective, and the profound sorrow they feel for the loss of their son is balanced by an enlightened and ultimately hopeful view.  Vico’s vivid testimony, Snapchat video of his slain friend, and security footage of his rescue bring the Pulse tragedy to searing life.  But though every participant in the film endured unimaginable loss, the movie is ultimately neither depressing nor didactic.  It does a great job of outlining the current state of the LGBT struggle, explaining how, in the wake of marriage equality, trans folks became the new scapegoat for the religious right.  But if McBride is any indication, not to mention the other resilient and courageous figures depicted in the film, we’re not going down without a fight.


For They Know Not What They Do screens as part of the Tribeca Film Festival.  Visit tribecafilm.com for more info.

The Geeks OUT Podcast: I Am Mother’s Day

The Geeks OUT Podcast

Opinions, reviews, incisive discussions of queer geek ideas in pop culture, and the particularly cutting brand of shade that you can only get from a couple of queer geeks all in highly digestible weekly doses.

In this week’s super-sized episode of the Geeks OUT Podcast, Kevin is joined by J.W. Crump, as they discuss the new trailers for Spider-Man: Far From Home and It: Chapter 2, and celebrate The CW ordering Batwoman, Nancy Drew, and Katy Keene to series as our Strong Female Characters of This Week in Queer.

.

BIG OPENING

KEVIN: New trailer for Spider-Man: Far From Home
J.W.: New trailer for It: Chapter 2, which will feature controversial scene from the book

.

DOWN AND NERDY

KEVIN: Agents of SHIELD, Cloak & Dagger, The Society, Riverdale
J.W.: Shark Tank, Tuca & Bertie

.

STRONG FEMALE CHARACTERS of THIS WEEK IN QUEER

CW orders Batwoman to series, along with Nancy Drew & Katy Keene

.

CLIP OF THE WEEK

New trailer for I Am Mother

.

THE WEEK IN GEEK

MOVIES

The Bob’s Burgers movie is coming out July 2020
• The New Mutants now coming out April 2020, Gambit never
• We’re getting Star Wars & Avatar movies every other year starting in 2021
David S. Goyer is working on a Hellraiser reboot

.

TV

• 14 shows were canceled in one day, including The Passage
• Some have been saved (The Orville, What We Do in the Shadows, & more)
• FX orders A Christmas Carol miniseries starring Guy Pearce and Andy Serkis
• New trailer for the final season of Legion
• New teaser for HBO’s Watchmen
• Netflix orders an interactive Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt special
• Geena Davis joins season 3 of She-Ra and the Princesses of Power

.

COMIC BOOKS

Oni Press & Lion Forge merge, resulting in many layoffs
Marvel celebrating 80th anniversary with massive anthology of 80 stories

.

SHILF

• KEVIN: Speckle
• J.W.: Tuca & Bertie

The Geeks OUT Podcast: EndGame of Thrones Spoilerpalooza

The Geeks OUT Podcast

Opinions, reviews, incisive discussions of queer geek ideas in pop culture, and the particularly cutting brand of shade that you can only get from a couple of queer geeks all in highly digestible weekly doses.

In this week’s super-sized episode of the Geeks OUT Podcast, Kevin is joined by Jon Herzog, as they share their spoiler filled thoughts on Avengers Endgame and Game of Thrones’ Battle of Winterfell, discuss controversies surrounding the latest Uncanny X-Men and Sonic the Hedgehog film, and celebrate Veronica Mars as our Strong Female Character of the Week.

.

BIG OPENING

KEVIN: Avengers Endgame projected to become highest grossing movie ever
JON: Game of Thrones’ Battle of Winterfell had over 17 mil viewers

.

DOWN AND NERDY

KEVIN: Happy!, iZombie, Heroes in Crisis, DCeased
JON: She-Ra Season 2

.

STRONG FEMALE CHARACTER

New trailer for revival of Veronica Mars

.

THIS WEEK IN QUEER

Latest issue of Uncanny X-Men features a tone-deaf murder disguised as allegory (check out other important discussions on this here and here)

.

CLIP OF THE WEEK

The first trailer for Sonic the Hedgehog reactions lead to a character redesign

.

THE WEEK IN GEEK

MOVIES

Fantastic Beasts 3 moved to 2021
• The HS play version of Alien now available online
• Guardians of the Galaxy Vol 3 reportedly filming in 2020
Next Spider-Man: Far From Home trailer to come with a spoiler alert
New trailer for Crawl
California makes Star Wars Day an official holiday

.

TV

• New trailer for season 6 of Agents of SHIELD
• New trailer for season 3 of The Handmaid’s Tale
• Hulu orders Ghost Rider and Helstrom series
• New trailer for The Society
• The revival to The Twilight Zone has been renewed

.

COMIC BOOKS

She-Ra and The Princesses of Power getting a graphic novel

.

SHILF

• KEVIN: America’s Ass
• JON: Daddy Tony Stark

TFF 2019 Review: Gay Chorus Deep South

After an emotional performance in Charlotte, chorus members console each other

Early on in David Charles Rodrigues’ exquisite Gay Chorus Deep South, San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus artistic director Dr. Tim Seelig is working in his office. He explains that he keeps himself surrounded by “queens,” Queen Elizabeth and San Francisco legend—and gay hero—Harvey Milk among them.  So it’s fitting that the Chorus takes inspiration from Milk, who famously used a lavender pen to sign groundbreaking gay rights legislation into law, in naming their post Trump Lavender Pen Tour.  The men travel from Tennessee to Alabama to the Carolinas, looking to spread hope and ignite dialogue.  Interestingly enough, assumptions are challenged on both sides.  A queer historian complains that the concept reeks of condescension.  A Southern Baptist church, meanwhile, welcomes the group with open arms. 

Ashlé, the first trans individual accepted into a Gay Men’s Chorus, stands their ground in America’s most discriminatory states

Rodrigues shoots the film beautifully, with sweeping overhead shots, intimate access to the performances, and skillful editing.  The music is beautiful and accomplished, naturally, and it weaves in and out of sequences seamlessly.  A sequence in Selma, where the men hold a triumphant concert and walk across the famed Edmund Pettus Bridge, is particularly striking.  We get to know a few of the men particularly well.  Seelig reveals his painful history with the Southern Baptist Church and the havoc wreaked on his family when he came out.  Jimmy White is fighting cancer and hoping for reconciliation with his staunchly conservative father.  Perhaps most compelling is
Ashlé , who struggles to come to terms with their gender identity and finds unwavering acceptance in the men of the Chorus.  Thus this film is one of several notable examples of trans stories being told at Tribeca this year; Jeanie Finlay’s beautiful Seahorse and Changing the Game being two others.


Gay Chorus Deep South takes a story that is compelling and of the moment and delivers it with precision and heart.


Gay Chorus Deep South screens this week as part of the Tribeca Film Festival. Visit tribecafilm.com for more.

TFF 2019: VR Arcade Review

Tribeca’s annual Virtual Arcade Featuring Storyscapes is back with another diverse assortment of VR experiences.  I got the chance to experience four, including the remarkable Another Dream, second in the transmedia series Queer In A Time of Forced Migration.  Readers should note that this year’s Arcade also includes Doctor Who: The Runaway, an animated tale featuring the new Doctor—and a full scale Tardis on site!

Another Dream

In Another Dream, directed by Tamara Shogaolu, viewers meet a lesbian couple forced to flee Egypt in search of safety in the Netherlands.  It’s an incredibly moving story, elegantly animated; watching it, I couldn’t help but be bowled over by the immense courage of its subjects.  While the interactivity left a bit to be desired—all you get to “do” is trace the Arabic characters for each chapter title—the immersive nature of the short makes you feel like you are living through the predicament with the women.  You also share in their newfound peace and hope. 


Kevin Cornish’s ambitious 2nd Civil War plays a bit like an augmented reality Purge installment.  Like that franchise, it’s ambitious and more than a little on-the-nose hammy.  The experience begins in the “real” world, where a tough-as-nails army officer begrudgingly approves your pass to report from the Conflict Zone of a war torn America.  (The actress was utterly real and made me distinctly uncomfortable.)  In the VR component, a prologue mixing real and recreated news footage leads into a series of encounters with dystopian Baltimore residents. You can speak dialogue from a range of options; unfortunately, I had to repeat some of the lines multiple times for the people to “hear” me.  Cheesy acting from some of the participants, like a one-armed journalist and a trashy tattooed mom, as well as the choppy integration of performers and background plates distracted from the intended effect.

Gymnasia

The Canadian Gymnasia, directed by Clyde Henry Productions, gets an A for physical environment: a decrepit classroom with hard plastic chairs, pages of music strewn across the floor, and two nightmare fuel baby dolls, one seated and the other roaming eerily on wheels.  The VR itself is cool and creepy: balls and butterflies skitter across the floor and the dolls start singing one of those “childlike” songs calculated to give goose bumps.  It’s all nifty to look at, but ultimately feels like just so much production design in search of a Conjuring spinoff.

For pure, adorable entertainment, you probably can’t beat Eric Darnell’s Bonfire made by Baobab Studios.  The director cut his teeth on the Madagascar movies and Antz, and it shows: the adventure plays like a particularly witty “kiddie” movie that you’d have no problem sitting through.  Ali Wong is pitch perfect hilarious as a neurotic robot who, following a crash landing on a potentially hostile alien planet, keeps nagging you to look out for danger.  It will come as no surprise that Pork Bun the alien is no threat but rather a cute new friend—you can even pet it!  Ultimately you choose how to proceed with regard to this potential colonization site, and the fate of Pork Bun.  Viewers receive a cool souvenir video of their experience afterwards.


The VR Arcade plays daily as part of the Tribeca Film Festival.  Visit tribecafilm.com/immersive for more.

TFF 2019 Review: Bliss

Dora Madison as Dezzy

I always consider it a point of pride when I see a film people walk out of.  At House of 1000 Corpses, a couple walked out as the woman loudly declared “let’s get the FUCK out of here!”; another pair fled Suspiria (2018) after a nasty bit of body contortion.  So it pleased me that a few folks just couldn’t sit through Bliss, writer/director Joe Begos’ hallucinogenic vampire flick playing the Midnight category at the Tribeca Film Festival.  Interestingly, they all left before any of the bloody mayhem even got started; the visceral intensity of the filmmaking seems to be what they couldn’t handle.


Bliss opens with a warning about strobe effects, which seems as much part of the exploitation tradition as a legitimate caveat.  After a day glo, rock and roll opening title sequence, we meet Dezzy (Dora Madison), a starving artist struggling to pay the bills while battling a pretty heavy drug problem.  She’s got a deadline looming for her latest piece, an appropriately eerie painting of souls writhing in fire, but she can’t seem to find the inspiration to finish it, despite the help of a well-meaning boyfriend Clive (Jeremy Gardner).  Maybe that’s because she’s too busy scoring drugs from her pal Hadrian (Graham Skipper) and partying with her girlfriend and sometime lover Courtney (Tru Collins, giving off trashy Lady Gaga vibes) and Courtney’s boyfriend Ronnie (Rhys Wakefield).  When Hadrian slips her a coke variant called Bliss, Dezzy’s instantly hooked, but the bad trip it sends her on is compounded by a simultaneous thirst for blood.  Dezzy’s life quickly spins out of control—to put it mildly.

Jeremy Gardner as Clive, Tru Collins as Courtney,and Rhys Wakefield as Ronnie

Bliss is an impressively crafted movie, with stunning cinematography and lighting and a hard driving metal soundtrack.  Madison is remarkable as Dezzy, a character that could easily come off as selfish and obnoxious, but who is vividly real and funny in the actress’ capable hands.  The screenplay is smart and pretty damn funny, and the intensity of the filmmaking makes Bliss a movie you experience more than watch.  There’s also outstanding use of locations—the various bars, Dezzy’s apartment, and Hadrian’s house are all vividly real places.  Where Bliss might be polarizing is with regards to the copious drug use and the extremely intense, bloody violence (thought to be fair, isn’t that exactly what a vampire movie should have in spades?).  The finale is so gruesomely over the top that I wasn’t quite sure how I felt about it.  But this movie really goes for it, and Begos and his crew are undeniably talented.  However you feel about Bliss, you won’t soon forget it.


Bliss screens Wednesday at 9:45 as part of the Tribeca Film Festival.  Visit tribecafilm.com for more info.